Biomedical Engineering!

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Sep 1

mymodernmet:

In just under a month, My Modern Met will be on the ground in Calgary, covering the most exciting art+science+engineering event of the year. Beakerhead is an annual, citywide, interactive movement that brings together brilliant minds to one place for five spectacular days, September 10-14, 2014. Check out the full calendar of events here!

In direct partnership with Beakerhead, My Modern Met will be live-blogging at the event, taking photos and videos to give you, our readers, a first-hand experience as if you were there with us. As a bonus to those who plan to attend, we’ll be giving away two free tickets to one of the main events, The Tremendous and Curious World of Beakerhead,over on our Facebook page, so be sure to keep an eye out for the giveaway!

engineeringhistory:

Pierre and Marie Curie, circa 1890s. Marie Skłodowska-Curie conducted pioneering research on radiation, and was the first woman to be awarded a Nobel Prize, and the only person to be awarded two Nobel Prizes in multiple fields (Physics, 1903, Chemistry, 1911).

engineeringhistory:

Pierre and Marie Curie, circa 1890s. Marie Skłodowska-Curie conducted pioneering research on radiation, and was the first woman to be awarded a Nobel Prize, and the only person to be awarded two Nobel Prizes in multiple fields (Physics, 1903, Chemistry, 1911).

reg-barclay:

People are going back to school soon and I’m seeing a lot of study help/masterposts on my dash aimed towards paper-based courses with emphasis on writing tips and essays. So I decided to make one for my STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering + Maths) brothers and sisters - with emphasis on facts, formulas and all that other left-brain goodness! 

・゚:*(ノ◕ヮ◕)*:・゚✧

GENERAL STUDY TIPS
SCIENCE + MATHS
MUSIC
CHILL OUT [DO NOT USE WHILE ACTUALLY STUDYING]
BLOGS/WEBSITES
OTHER STUFF
  1. just try your hardest!! a fact i learned the hard way is that unfortunately, not everyone is going to get full marks on everything. so honestly just do your best and don’t beat yourself up because you aren’t top of the class. you worked your ass off and you should be proud of that.
  2. please please practice good self care in all forms. do light exercise where possible, don’t just eat fast food, get plenty of fruits and veggies and protein. PLEASE pay attention to your mental state and react accordingly. at the end of the day, nothing is worth putting you in any kind of hospital. talk to your teachers, counselors or tutors if you get stuck.
  3. if you have no other reason to take care of yourself, your grades will suffer if you don’t. (i’m adding this bc the only reason i didn’t develop a full-blown eating disorder during my exams was because i knew not eating would hinder my brain)
  4. lastly, your grades are not a reflection of your value as a person. this is important. lower grades do not make you a lesser being, and higher grades do not make you superior. everyone has strengths and weaknesses and grades are a shitty way of measuring them, but it’s what we’ve got.
laboratoryequipment:

3-D Printers Produce Custom Medical ImplantsA team of researchers at Louisiana Tech Univ. has developed an innovative method for using affordable, consumer-grade 3-D printers and materials to fabricate custom medical implants that can contain antibacterial and chemotherapeutic compounds for targeted drug delivery.The team comprised of doctoral students and research faculty from Louisiana Tech’s biomedical engineering and nanosystems engineering programs collaborated to create filament extruders that can make medical-quality 3-D printing filaments. Creating these filaments, which have specialized properties for drug delivery, is a new concept that can result in smart drug delivering medical implants or catheters.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/3-d-printers-produce-custom-medical-implants

laboratoryequipment:

3-D Printers Produce Custom Medical Implants

A team of researchers at Louisiana Tech Univ. has developed an innovative method for using affordable, consumer-grade 3-D printers and materials to fabricate custom medical implants that can contain antibacterial and chemotherapeutic compounds for targeted drug delivery.

The team comprised of doctoral students and research faculty from Louisiana Tech’s biomedical engineering and nanosystems engineering programs collaborated to create filament extruders that can make medical-quality 3-D printing filaments. Creating these filaments, which have specialized properties for drug delivery, is a new concept that can result in smart drug delivering medical implants or catheters.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/3-d-printers-produce-custom-medical-implants

I know this has nothing to do with engineering but look I met Stan Lee!!!
(I’m the blonde on the left)

I know this has nothing to do with engineering but look I met Stan Lee!!!
(I’m the blonde on the left)

txchnologist:

Graphene-Based Artificial Retina Sensor Being Developed

Researchers at Germany’s Technical University of Munich are developing graphene sensors like the ones depicted above to serve as artificial retinas. The atom-thick sheet of linked carbon atoms is being used because it is thin, flexible, stronger than steel, transparent and electrically conductive. 

TUM physicists think that all of these characteristics and graphene’s compatibility with the body make it a strong contender to serve as the interface between a retinal prosthetic that converts light to electric impulses and the optic nerve. A graphene-based sensor could help blind people with healthy nerve tissue see, they say.

Read More

(Source: the-mathematical-poet)

ylwols:

totallyfubar:

If this doesn’t make you excited about science, get outta ma face.

ylwols:

totallyfubar:

If this doesn’t make you excited about science, get outta ma face.

(Source: guccigrass)

bpod-mrc:

09 August 2014
Mind Controllers
This display of ‘lit-up’ cells has hidden wiring that would put Blackpool Illuminations to shame (and it’s around 200,000-times smaller). Inside the nervous system of a young sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis), cells (blue dots) send signals to each other. One signal, called notch, tells a cell to develop into a neuron [nerve cell], while another, called delta, turns its neighbours’ notch signal ‘off’. It’s a complicated situation, calling for a mathematical model to unravel hidden details: other notch controllers send long distance signals along strips of developing cells (red), urging neurons to grow outwards in an irregular pattern (green). Mathematical modelling in biological research can be very powerful, in this case making predictions for how notch and delta work together in other tissues and organisms. Notch is heavily involved in human brain development, too, as well as helping to define the pattern of our fingers and toes in the womb.
Written by John Ankers
—
Image by Joseph Mahaffy and colleaguesSan Diego State University, USAOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)Research published in PLOS Computational Biology, June 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

09 August 2014

Mind Controllers

This display of ‘lit-up’ cells has hidden wiring that would put Blackpool Illuminations to shame (and it’s around 200,000-times smaller). Inside the nervous system of a young sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis), cells (blue dots) send signals to each other. One signal, called notch, tells a cell to develop into a neuron [nerve cell], while another, called delta, turns its neighbours’ notch signal ‘off’. It’s a complicated situation, calling for a mathematical model to unravel hidden details: other notch controllers send long distance signals along strips of developing cells (red), urging neurons to grow outwards in an irregular pattern (green). Mathematical modelling in biological research can be very powerful, in this case making predictions for how notch and delta work together in other tissues and organisms. Notch is heavily involved in human brain development, too, as well as helping to define the pattern of our fingers and toes in the womb.

Written by John Ankers

Image by Joseph Mahaffy and colleagues
San Diego State University, USA
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
Research published in PLOS Computational Biology, June 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

16 August 2014
3D-Printed Corpses
Teaching human anatomy to student doctors and budding biomedical scientists requires the dissection of human corpses. The problem is, dead bodies are not always readily available to teaching hospitals. In recent years dissection-based teaching has declined because of the costs and ethical problems involved with acquiring cadavers. There are also concerns about exposure to formaldehyde, a toxic compound used in embalming fluids. Now 3D printing offers an alternative: highly detailed colour models of human body parts based on data from computer tomography scans of real bodies. Researchers have debuted the fabrication technique by printing a polymer hand (pictured) featuring tendons, muscles, arteries, nerves, skin and bone. Such reproductions should be particularly useful in countries where religious beliefs mean bequest programs are banned.
Written by Daniel Cossins
—
Image by Paul McMenamin and colleaguesMonash University, Australia Copyright held by original authorsResearch published in Anatomical Sciences Education, June 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

16 August 2014

3D-Printed Corpses

Teaching human anatomy to student doctors and budding biomedical scientists requires the dissection of human corpses. The problem is, dead bodies are not always readily available to teaching hospitals. In recent years dissection-based teaching has declined because of the costs and ethical problems involved with acquiring cadavers. There are also concerns about exposure to formaldehyde, a toxic compound used in embalming fluids. Now 3D printing offers an alternative: highly detailed colour models of human body parts based on data from computer tomography scans of real bodies. Researchers have debuted the fabrication technique by printing a polymer hand (pictured) featuring tendons, muscles, arteries, nerves, skin and bone. Such reproductions should be particularly useful in countries where religious beliefs mean bequest programs are banned.

Written by Daniel Cossins

Image by Paul McMenamin and colleagues
Monash University, Australia
Copyright held by original authors
Research published in Anatomical Sciences Education, June 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook