Biomedical Engineering!

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engineeringhistory:

An early example of electrocardiography, 1922.

engineeringhistory:

An early example of electrocardiography, 1922.

eutektiks:

iHealth Labs Announces iGlucometer to Better Monitor Your iHealth

iHealth Labs announced the iHealth Smart GlucoMeter, a  blood glucose system that utilizes your iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch with an  attached dongle to quickly and easily measure your blood glucose levels  and keep them in check.

This is obviously a good step to incorporate a glucose monitor within apple devices, considering the number of consumers who are going to own apple devices is only going to increase. The very nice aspect that I feel that most diabetic consumers are going to appreciate is the logging capabilities of this device. Now, another good future step will be to find a non-invasive way to take blood glucose readings.

eutektiks:

iHealth Labs Announces iGlucometer to Better Monitor Your iHealth

iHealth Labs announced the iHealth Smart GlucoMeter, a blood glucose system that utilizes your iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch with an attached dongle to quickly and easily measure your blood glucose levels and keep them in check.

This is obviously a good step to incorporate a glucose monitor within apple devices, considering the number of consumers who are going to own apple devices is only going to increase. The very nice aspect that I feel that most diabetic consumers are going to appreciate is the logging capabilities of this device. Now, another good future step will be to find a non-invasive way to take blood glucose readings.

eutektiks:

UCSD Electronic Wireless Tattoo Receives Grant from the Gates Foundation

Described as an electronic “tattoo”, the device is a wearable patch of circuits, sensors, and wireless transmitters that sticks to the skin like a temporary tattoo and is able to stretch and flex with the skin. The researchers hope that the final product will continuously measure and monitor uterine contractions, fetal heart rate and oxygen, and maternal heart rate and body temperature.

The nice aspects of this device includes its ability to continuously monitor the status of the fetus within the womb in a noninvasive manner and to transmit the data wirelessly to physicians. Aside from its usage of monitoring fetal health, be prepared to notice the varying usage of the electric “tattoo” concept. In fact, one of its usages has been explored in this blog a while back as a food monitor.

eutektiks:

UCSD Electronic Wireless Tattoo Receives Grant from the Gates Foundation

Described as an electronic “tattoo”, the device is a wearable patch of circuits, sensors, and wireless transmitters that sticks to the skin like a temporary tattoo and is able to stretch and flex with the skin. The researchers hope that the final product will continuously measure and monitor uterine contractions, fetal heart rate and oxygen, and maternal heart rate and body temperature.

The nice aspects of this device includes its ability to continuously monitor the status of the fetus within the womb in a noninvasive manner and to transmit the data wirelessly to physicians. Aside from its usage of monitoring fetal health, be prepared to notice the varying usage of the electric “tattoo” concept. In fact, one of its usages has been explored in this blog a while back as a food monitor.

s-c-i-guy:

Self-healing engineered muscle grown in the laboratory
Living skeletal muscle that contracts powerfully and rapidly, integrates quickly into mice, and for the first time, demonstrates the ability to heal itself both inside the laboratory and inside an animal has been grown in the lab by biomedical engineers. “The muscle we have made represents an important advance for the field,” an author said. “It’s the first time engineered muscle has been created that contracts as strongly as native neonatal skeletal muscle.”
Biomedical engineers have grown living skeletal muscle that looks a lot like the real thing. It contracts powerfully and rapidly, integrates into mice quickly, and for the first time, demonstrates the ability to heal itself both inside the laboratory and inside an animal.
The study conducted at Duke University tested the bioengineered muscle by literally watching it through a window on the back of living mouse. The novel technique allowed for real-time monitoring of the muscle’s integration and maturation inside a living, walking animal.
Both the lab-grown muscle and experimental techniques are important steps toward growing viable muscle for studying diseases and treating injuries, said Nenad Bursac, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Duke.
The results appear the week of March 25 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.
Read More

s-c-i-guy:

Self-healing engineered muscle grown in the laboratory

Living skeletal muscle that contracts powerfully and rapidly, integrates quickly into mice, and for the first time, demonstrates the ability to heal itself both inside the laboratory and inside an animal has been grown in the lab by biomedical engineers. “The muscle we have made represents an important advance for the field,” an author said. “It’s the first time engineered muscle has been created that contracts as strongly as native neonatal skeletal muscle.”

Biomedical engineers have grown living skeletal muscle that looks a lot like the real thing. It contracts powerfully and rapidly, integrates into mice quickly, and for the first time, demonstrates the ability to heal itself both inside the laboratory and inside an animal.

The study conducted at Duke University tested the bioengineered muscle by literally watching it through a window on the back of living mouse. The novel technique allowed for real-time monitoring of the muscle’s integration and maturation inside a living, walking animal.

Both the lab-grown muscle and experimental techniques are important steps toward growing viable muscle for studying diseases and treating injuries, said Nenad Bursac, associate professor of biomedical engineering at Duke.

The results appear the week of March 25 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

Read More

aviatior:

Lab-Grown Body Parts May Soon Be ‘Mass Produced’ And Even Affordable, Says UK Scientist

Scientists say producing custom body parts like noses and ears on a larger scale isn’t so farfetched.

aviatior:

Lab-Grown Body Parts May Soon Be ‘Mass Produced’ And Even Affordable, Says UK Scientist

Scientists say producing custom body parts like noses and ears on a larger scale isn’t so farfetched.

logicianmagician:

Will People Alive Today Have The Opportunity To Upload Their Consciousness To A New Robotic Body?

At the recent Global Future 2045 International Congress held in Moscow, 31-year-old media mogul Dmitry Itskov told attendees how he plans to create exactly that kind of immortality, first by creating a robot controlled by the human brain, then by actually transplanting a human brain into a humanoid robot, and then by replacing the surgical transplant with a method for simply uploading a person’s consciousness into a surrogate ‘bot. He thinks he can get beyond the first phase—to transplanting a working brain into a robot—in just ten years, putting him on course to achieve his ultimate goal—human consciousness completely disembodied and placed within a holographic host—within 30 years time. 

logicianmagician:

Will People Alive Today Have The Opportunity To Upload Their Consciousness To A New Robotic Body?

At the recent Global Future 2045 International Congress held in Moscow, 31-year-old media mogul Dmitry Itskov told attendees how he plans to create exactly that kind of immortality, first by creating a robot controlled by the human brain, then by actually transplanting a human brain into a humanoid robot, and then by replacing the surgical transplant with a method for simply uploading a person’s consciousness into a surrogate ‘bot. He thinks he can get beyond the first phase—to transplanting a working brain into a robot—in just ten years, putting him on course to achieve his ultimate goal—human consciousness completely disembodied and placed within a holographic host—within 30 years time. 

skeptv:

Born to Engineer - Biomedical bubbles with Eleanor Stride

"If I were to say that the complexity of what we do is the same as the complexity of designing a car, I wouldn’t be exaggerating."

Since 2007 biomedical engineer Eleanor Stride has been designing a revolutionary new method of delivering drugs by injecting tiny microbubbles into the bloodstream.

Traditional drug delivery through pills or injection send the active agent through the bloodstream meaning that a high percentage of cells in the body are exposed to the drug. In contrast, the targetted delivery mechanism with bubbles aims to release the drugs only when they reach the part of the body where they are needed.

Some of the bubbles are magnetic and the research team is using groundbreaking techniques developed by the Davy Faraday Research Laboratory at the Royal Institution to control the movement and activation of the bubbles within the body.

This drug delivery method has the potential to avoid the widespread destruction of healthy cells that is presently unavoidable with chemotherapy, which would revolutionise the future treatment of cancer sufferers.

The film was produced by Duckrabbit for the ERA Foundation as part of a pilot scheme to demonstrate how engineering is changing lives and how the world works. Ultimately, the project aims to attract young people towards engineering education and careers.

via The Royal Institution.


(Source: jtotheizzoe)

proofmathisbeautiful:

This is Your Brain on Engineering (GoldieBlox Easter PSA)

At age 2, girls start to identify with their gender. Or, more accurately, all kids start to understand that they have a gender, and become more aware of the social influences for how they should act as a result. In our culture, there are narrow blueprints called “boy” and “girl” that dictate to us all what is and is not the “right” way to act. These blueprints are pretty limiting — “boys don’t cry” and “girls are princesses” aren’t exactly the greatest life mottos. Gendered influences come from everywhere around kids: their parents, their friends, their teachers, the games they play, the movies they watch, the books they read… the list is endless, and all of it sends a message, sometimes negative and often limiting, about what is and isn’t a “girl thing” or a “boy thing.”

aviatior:

Heart Implants, 3-D-Printed to Order

Just right: An array of sensors is embedded in a material designed to fit a beating heart perfectly.

aviatior:

Heart Implants, 3-D-Printed to Order

Just right: An array of sensors is embedded in a material designed to fit a beating heart perfectly.